6.8

The Railway Children

After the enforced absence of their father, the three Waterbury children move with their mother to Yorkshire, where they find themselves involved in several unexpected dramas along the railway by their new home. #The Railway, the Children . . . and the wonderful secret they'll share with you !
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John Chard

at 11:24 am

It's like we're in a besieged castle, the arrows of the foe striking against the battlements. Adapted from E. Nesbit's much adored novel, this filmic version is directed by Lionel Jeffries and stars Dinah Sheridan, Bernard Cribbins, William Mervyn, Iain Cuthbertson, Jenny Agutter, Sally Thomsett and Gary Warren. Music is by Johnny Douglas and cinematography by Arthur Ibbetson. Rightly thought of as a British classic, story finds three children relocating to Yorkshire after their father has wrongly been imprisoned for treason. Trying to go about their fatherless life in this small Yorkshire village, they find solace in the happenings of the local railway station, and from there action, drama and pending adulthood does beckon. Picture comes with splendid Edwardian detail, of a time long since lost to Britain. Jeffries never once over eggs the Yorkshire pudding, filling out his pic with great dramatic sequences and wonderful coming of age literacy. Boosted by a scintillating turn from a then 18 year old Agutter as the eldest Waterbury sibling holding things together during a one parent crisis, this is a beautiful picture that reminds us of better times. 9/10


Peter McGinn

at 19:02 pm

A film version of another one of those children's classic novels from the early 20th century. The younger actors from necessity need to carry a movie like this, and I thought they did a grand job. They don’t overact much at all, and are sometimes subtle with a witty line or childlike observation. I also thought Bernard Cribbins did a wonderful job as Perks, crusty on the surface, but only on the surface, and full of energy and enthusiasm bringing the role to life. The rest of the ensemble cast were fine also. It was well worth watching. There are other versions, though the only one that intrigues me is the mini-series version as it will have more time to include additional scenes from the book.