6.3

Dune

In the year 10,191, the world is at war for control of the desert planet Arrakis—the only place where the space-travel substance Melange 'Spice' can be found. But when one leader gives up control, it's only so he can stage a coup with some unsavory characters. #A world beyond your experience, beyond your imagination.
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JPV852

at 03:49 am

I know this one has a decent fanbase (both of the novel and movie) but as someone who never read the novel, this first viewing, I found it to be... okay. I can appreciate some of the effects both practical and visual (for its time) but the story and characters never really grabbed me. I was never bored however wasn't engaged and thought, and perhaps this is how it was with the novel), the main character played by Kyle McLaghlan didn't seem to face much conflict outside of a knife-to-knife fight at the end with Sting, which was anti-climactic and underwhelming considering he already got his revenge on his father's murderer. Not sure I have much interest in coming back to this but have some interest to see what Denis Villeneuve does with his adaptation. **3.0/5**


badelf

at 06:26 am

I read Frank Herbert's book, _Dune_, when I was in high school and really don't remember it much except that it was great and a little scary. At that age, I probably didn't get the subtext message. I never saw any movies of it so I decided to watch both the 1984 Dune by David Lynch and the 2021 Denis Villeneuve version sequentially. I review Lynch's version here and both versions in my 2021 Dune review. This may not be a popular opinion: Lynch's version (this one) is **brilliant** and the Villeneuve Dune is absolute **shit**. Here's why: Are the character's in David Lynch's version kitschy and over the top? Yes! That's one reason it's so much better! It's Sci Fi, duh! You watch Marvel movies and suspend disbelief for super powers? All of Lynch's characters are downright gritty and believable within this particular surreal fantasy. By the end of the Lynch Dune, I had sympathy for nearly every character in the film. Even the villains caught my emotions. Paul Atreides character development was realistic and attractive. But here's the clincher: the screenplay. David Lynch gave us a complete story. Sadly, he didn't have the final cut and disowned his film when the critics panned it. Despite the fact that Lynch is a true artist and genius, the studio took 45 minutes out of the film. 45 minutes! I would LOVE to see the original cut! Even ruined by the studio, even 40 years later, Lynch's film has a clear vision and carries the timeless message that Frank Herbert intended. I can't say that for the Villeneuve version. Do yourself a favor and see David Lynch's version.